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Tuesday, September 2, 2014 |  Madison, WI: 57.0° F  A Few Clouds
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NEWS

Frautschi, Rowland dig in their heels on Block 100 development

The Block 100 Foundation drew a line in the sand Wednesday with a letter to Madison's Urban Design Commission, stating if they cannot tear down the historic landmark Schubert Building and its neighbor, the Fairchild Building, they will abandon the project and sell the buildings. The letter, signed by Overture benefactors Jerome Frautschi and Pleasant Rowland, as well as Jerome's son, Grant, says the private garden plaza proposed for where the Schubert and Fairchild Buildings (120 and 122 W. Mifflin St.) now stand is the most important part of the project for them. >More
 'One Year Longer, One Year Stronger' campaign marks anniversary of Wisconsin protests

A year can feel both like a blip and an eternity, depending upon how one experiences that time and looks back at it in memory. This is certainly the case for participants and observers of the demonstrations that rocked the Wisconsin Capitol last year, the momentous opening to a historic political showdown across the Badger State that has yet to be decided. Now protest participants are commemorating the one-year anniversary of the inception to Wisconsin's Walker era. >More
 Top Obama aide Valerie Jarrett raises funds in Madison despite stiff competition from recalls

In what amounts to the local kickoff of Barack Obama's presidential re-election campaign, Valerie Jarrett stopped in Madison Monday to headline a $200-per-person fundraiser at the Sherman Avenue home of Mary Lang Sollinger. >More
 Tepid response to Nerad's plan to close achievement gap in Madison school district

Madison school superintendent Dan Nerad unveiled his long awaited, and much anticipated plan to close the district's more than 40-year-old racial achievement gap Monday night before the full school board and around 75 citizens who packed into a room inside the Fitchburg library. >More
 Soglin won't ban Mifflin Street Block Party, but calls for an overhaul

The main question prompted by Mayor Paul Soglin in a meeting with student leaders on the future of the Mifflin Street Block Party was how to go about "threading the needle" to keep this year's event a safe and viable option. >More
 Madison schools superintendent Dan Nerad releases plan to address achievement gap

The Madison Metropolitan School District and superintendent Dan Nerad have released plans for addressing the achievement gap in time to be discussed at the Board of Education meeting on Monday, February 6. The project is titled "Building Our Future: The Preliminary Plan for Eliminating Gaps in MMSD Student Achievement" -- stay tuned here tonight for our report. >More
 Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin follows Komen decision with call to restore state funding

Under intense pressure from outraged supporters, Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation has reversed its decision to discontinue funding Planned Parenthood. "The events of this week have been deeply unsettling for our supporters, partners and friends and all of us at Susan G. Komen." Nancy G. Brinker, founder and CEO of Komen, said in a statement released Friday. >More
 Block 100 proposal criticized, but UDC members encourage redevelopment

The proposal for the 100 block of State Street got more bruising criticism Wednesday night, this time from the Urban Design Commission. "I strongly feel that corner building needs to remain," said Dawn O'Kroley, an architect and UDC member said of the Fairchild Building, 124 W. Mifflin St., which isn't a landmark, but is prized by preservationists. "That's a deal breaker for me." >More
 A closer look at Walker recall funds

It's difficult to write about the levels of money now being pumped into Wisconsin's electoral process without using terms like "jaw-dropping" and "eye-popping." It's a wonder we can still recognize ourselves in the mirror, with all these contortions. Take the recent filings from state campaigns preparing for recalls. >More
 Madison cooperatives offer an alternative to a system of haves and have-nots

Protesters flood the street, chants and song punctuated by drumming and the low, steady honk of a tuba. Sign after sign decries the attack against nurses, teachers and sanitation workers; others demand a living wage in bold letters. A man stands before a podium addressing the masses, crying, "Those who need the increases least get most, and those that need them most get least!" The crowd erupts in response. Sound familiar? >More
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