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Monday, July 28, 2014 |  Madison, WI: 66.0° F  Partly Cloudy
The Daily

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From lockdown to shutdown, a day of anger, a day of shame in the Wisconsin Capitol

The toughest thing I did today was get into the Wisconsin state Capitol. It took more than two hours. For the first time in a month of protests and restricted access, my press credentials -- actually a thick stack of them, one from each day -- got me nowhere. I'd hold these up to the windows of the doors at the various entrances, and the law enforcement officers inside would look at me and shake their heads. >More
 A teacher weeps for the future of Wisconsin schools

The morning after the Republicans stripped me of my rights, I stood in the hallway of my school, watching my four-year-olds stream in. They gave me hugs. They ran up to show me things: a new shirt, an extra pretty hair ribbon, a silly band. They wanted to know if it was chocolate milk day. They pointed out that one of their classmates, who had been out sick for a few days, had come finally come back! >More
 Peaceful relations break down between cops and Wisconsin protesters as Assembly votes on budget bill

The Capitol was a heavily guarded fortress on Thursday morning as the Assembly prepared to vote on a bill limiting collective bargaining for Wisconsin public employees. Peaceful relations between cops and protesters -- much remarked upon during the past three weeks of labor unrest -- were threatening to break down. >More
 Wisconsin Republican senators skedaddle from Capitol on Madison Metro bus

Police officers used a Madison Metro bus to transport Republican senators out of the state Capitol after they approved parts of Gov. Scott Walker's "budget-repair bill" in a hastily called session Wednesday night. At around 6:30 p.m., police asked Madison Metro for the use of a bus to transport the senators. >More
 Live-blogging Scott Walker and the public employee unions, Day 25

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 Uprising at the Wisconsin Capitol: Week 4

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 Supremely relevant: David Prosser vs. JoAnne Kloppenburg

David Prosser tells a story of how he intervened to protect the state Capitol's custodial staff. It happened during the week of Feb. 20, when the building was packed with people protesting Gov. Scott Walker's anti-union agenda. "Working in the building, the noise has just been deafening," says Prosser, since 1998 a Wisconsin Supreme Court justice. And so, when a custodian he knows well came into his chamber, he asked her, "Do you have earplugs?" She didn't. >More
 Wisconsin Supreme Court candidates may be only ones who limit spending

The April 5 election, the first and likely last in which Wisconsin Supreme Court candidates will accept public financing and abide by spending limits (Gov. Scott Walker's budget calls for axing this expenditure), will nonetheless see a huge outpouring of spending by special interest groups. >More
 Video of protests restarting inside the Wisconsin Capitol on Day 24

As a conference committee separated the collective bargaining language from Gov. Scott Walker's budget repair bill, protesters gathered inside the state Capitol to make their displeasure clear. >More
 Wisconsin GOP to public employees: Screw you

By the time I got there, it was already over and it was just beginning. I walked through the doors of the state Capitol at 6:23 pm, having raced back downtown after hearing word that the Republican state senators were meeting to achieve at least some of what's been denied them by the exodus of their 14 Democratic colleagues on Feb. 17. >More
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