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Sunday, September 21, 2014 |  Madison, WI: 61.0° F  Mostly Cloudy
The Daily

PEOPLE

#MyMadisonDay: A 24 hour odyssey through the city

Hundreds of people participated in #MyMadisonDay, a multimedia project seeking to capture 24 hours in the life of Madison and its people. Their stories are compiled at MyMadisonDay.com, in the form of reports, photos and tweets, and condensed in this weeks Isthmus cover story. I spent the entire day sharing the experiences of others -- here is my complete report. >More
 #MyMadisonDay: 24 hours in the life of the city

Freelancer Stu Levitan came up with the idea for a print piece chronicling a day in the life of Madison. We decided to take it a step further. We settled on a date (Sept. 21, 2012), cooked up a hashtag (#MyMadisonDay) and put out a call to the community to record, via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, the day's events, whether big or small. >More
 Patrick Farabaugh creates an extended LGBT family in Madison

The temperatures are pushing past 90 degrees and the sun is steadily warming the afternoon air, but Patrick Farabaugh is dressed in stiff blue jeans, a dark jacket and wool cap. He pushes open the door to the Madison Ice Arena and strides toward the ice rink for the weekly practice of the Madison Gay Hockey Association. >More
 A trio of World War II veterans reflect on their Badger Honor Flight experience (podcast)

Three World War II veterans from Madison sat down last week to reminisce about their experience during the war and a recent trip to Washington D.C. commemorating their service. Sam Fatsis, George Choles, and Ted Cappas have been friends for decades. In a roundtable discussion, they share their thoughts about the trip and what they appreciated about the experience, which ended with a welcome back to Madison. >More
 World War II vets treated to homecoming they never had with Badger Honor Flight

When Ted Cappas, now 87, returned from fighting in World War II, he traveled from Fort McCoy to Madison in his uncle's flower truck. There was no pomp or parade when he arrived home. His cousin George Choles, 87, and friend Sam Fatsis, 88, also returned home from the war without celebrations or thank you's. "No one greeted the World War II veterans after the war was over," says Cappas. "We just came back, went to work, and raised a family." >More
 Collector brings vintage Door County postcards to life with audio slideshows

Richard Lauder has been retired from teaching at Verona High School for 10 years, but he collects vintage postcards like it's his job. He says he prefers cards made before 1950 because of the "real photo quality" of the black and white ink. "Two-thirds of the joy of doing it is the hunt," Lauder says. "You never know where you're going to find a postcard." >More
 Slovakia to Wisconsin, Soviets to Walker: Ivan Vanek has seen a lot

Ivan Vanek stood among a crowd of hundreds on the evening of June 5, awaiting the results of the election to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker. Like many anxious Walker opponents who gathered on the Capitol Square that night, Vanek had protested the budget repair bill and like many, he cried when it was announced that Walker had won yet another gubernatorial race. >More
 Collaterally Damaged: An Iraqi native searches for peace in Madison

At night, when the lights go out, Ahmed Etaymish, 29, is transported from Madison back to Baghdad, where he relives the horror that followed the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003. Sometimes he reimagines his brushes with death or the murders he's witnessed. Other times he's choking on the mist of human tissue that lingers in the air following a car bombing. More often he's back in the morgues searching for his father, a university professor abducted by insurgents in 2005. >More
 To have and have not: 'Money comes and goes'

Essie McCoy came to Madison four years ago looking for a better life. The 34-year-old, her husband and five kids had been living in Michigan, but there was no work to be found. So they hopped on a bus and moved here, where McCoy's sister lives. >More
 To have and have not: Comparing Madison's rich and poor

Nicole Grapentine-Benton spent part of her childhood in Santiago, Chile, where the "huge skyscrapers and tiny shacks" sit side-by-side, the rich and poor "mashed up" together in an uneasy coexistence. When she came to Madison to study at the UW in 2000, she found a much different world. "My impression of Madison is it was a very planned city and just very segregated," says Grapentine-Benton, who now lives in Florida. "It was very easy to spend most of my day seeing only college students and ignoring huge swaths of the population." >More
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