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Bourgeoisie prices at the Willy St. Coop...

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Postby GenieU » Mon Aug 27, 2007 3:44 pm

We shop at both the coop and Woodman's.

The Coop does run specials. A box of Annie's Mac and cheese @ $1.25 was 75 cents less than Annie's at Woodmans' But still probably more than a Box of Kraft...

And the discount crates of nearly perished fruits and vegetables-there's your savings!

word to the wise: Coop meat should be cooked well done. At these prices they may not be moving a lot of product so you should check that your not buying something thats set there for a long time.
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Postby kweetech » Mon Aug 27, 2007 8:57 pm

GenieU wrote:We shop at both the coop and Woodman's.


same here...stock up on some bulk stuff at woody's every 6 weeks or so...buy fresh at the coop weekly.
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Postby roadkill bill » Tue Aug 28, 2007 1:24 pm

The only thingf that you bought that qualifies as a "staple" in my mind is the bread. Although I'm an omnivore, I recognize that meat - especially roast beef - is expensive, and I cut back on that if I need to pinch pennies. I'm a freaking chef with all sorts of beans, and they are dirt cheap.

Which brings me to the real question, how much are bulk items compared to Aldi's or Woody's? Rice, beans, milk, cheese, oatmeal, pasta, etc. are what form the basis of a meal. With Farmers' Market going whole hog (excuse the pun), carbs and spices are about the only thing I need to buy at a grocery store, and that's hardly worth a trip to Woodmans to save a few cents.
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Postby medbh » Tue Aug 28, 2007 1:42 pm

roadkill bill wrote:I'm a freaking chef with all sorts of beans, and they are dirt cheap.


I've been trying to cook more with beans and lentils. Are you willing to share any of your favorite recipes or do you have a website you'd recommend for these kinds of recipes?
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Postby TAsunder » Tue Aug 28, 2007 3:27 pm

At whole foods you'd have paid at least $20 for that stuff, if not more. At TJ's, less, if they actually carried any of it.
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Postby roadkill bill » Tue Aug 28, 2007 4:00 pm

medbh wrote:
roadkill bill wrote:I'm a freaking chef with all sorts of beans, and they are dirt cheap.


I've been trying to cook more with beans and lentils. Are you willing to share any of your favorite recipes or do you have a website you'd recommend for these kinds of recipes?


Recipe Source is good web site for all sorts of recipes. They let you search by ingredient, type of dish, and ethnicity. You rarely see, "add a can of this and a cup of this mix." That's my pet peeve when searching for recipes.

My recipes usually involve these steps:

1. Cook beans. Do NOT add anything sweet or acidic until the beans are cooked. I use a crock pot on high overnight. No pre-soaking needed. The easiest thing is just to cook the beans with water first, then go on to flavor and other ingredients. You can also freeze beans quite well, so you have them ready for other recipes.

2. Add tomatoes, onions, garlic, various veggies from the garden or fridge, salt, pepper, and spices.

3. Stick everything back in the crock pot during the day. Eat or freeze soup/stew when I come home.

I also make black and pinto beans for burritos, tacos, enchiladas, etc. Just cook the hell out of the beans until they are mushy. Add some oil, spices, onions & garlic, and mash them up. Freezes beautifully.

Lentil dahl over rice with yogurt topping is another stand by. I make my dahl much thicker than in Madison restaurants. Less like soup, more like stew. Same recipe as the soup/stew above, different spices. Lentil cook very quickly.

Any of the Moosewood cookbooks also have good bean recipes, because they substitute beans for meat in some dishes.
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Postby O.J. » Tue Aug 28, 2007 4:15 pm

I would recommend soaking beans unless you don't have the time. Unless you enjoy passing gas, soaking beans helps remove the indigestible sugars that cause flatulence. You also don't need to cook them for as long so they maintain more of their protein. Finally, they cook more evenly and won't crack to the extent that un-soaked beans do.
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Postby medbh » Tue Aug 28, 2007 7:11 pm

roadkill bill wrote:
1. Cook beans. Do NOT add anything sweet or acidic until the beans are cooked.



Yah, I learned that the hard way. I recently tried making homemade baked beans for the first time. I did the soaking thing, but added the tomatoes, salt and other ingredients before boiling. Seemed like it would save time just to put it all together and boil it once. Cooked it all for hours but it never got done. Found out afterwards that there's a reason you're supposed to boil the beans before adding all the other stuff.
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Postby white_rabbit » Tue Aug 28, 2007 9:23 pm

Is this...

pulsewidth modulation wrote:
The COOP board still spends too much time and money "educating" people about nonsense such as collectivism.


..related to this...?


roadkill bill wrote:



Recipe Source is good web site for all sorts of recipes. They let you search by ingredient, type of dish, and ethnicity. You rarely see, "add a can of this and a cup of this mix." That's my pet peeve when searching for recipes.

My recipes usually involve these steps:

1. Cook beans. Do NOT add anything sweet or acidic until the beans are cooked. I use a crock pot on high overnight. No pre-soaking needed. The easiest thing is just to cook the beans with water first, then go on to flavor and other ingredients. You can also freeze beans quite well, so you have them ready for other recipes.

2. Add tomatoes, onions, garlic, various veggies from the garden or fridge, salt, pepper, and spices.

3. Stick everything back in the crock pot during the day. Eat or freeze soup/stew when I come home.

I also make black and pinto beans for burritos, tacos, enchiladas, etc. Just cook the hell out of the beans until they are mushy. Add some oil, spices, onions & garlic, and mash them up. Freezes beautifully.

Lentil dahl over rice with yogurt topping is another stand by. I make my dahl much thicker than in Madison restaurants. Less like soup, more like stew. Same recipe as the soup/stew above, different spices. Lentil cook very quickly.

Any of the Moosewood cookbooks also have good bean recipes, because they substitute beans for meat in some dishes.


...if so, then I think educating people how to take advantage of bulk goods is a smart investment.
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