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The Dark Side of Greek Yogurt

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The Dark Side of Greek Yogurt

Postby rabble » Thu May 23, 2013 8:43 am

Nuts. I really like Chobani's pineapple. Now I look at it a little different. I knew there was a lot of byproduct but didn't know it was this bad.
For every three or four ounces of milk, Chobani and other companies can produce only one ounce of creamy Greek yogurt. The rest becomes acid whey. It’s a thin, runny waste product that can’t simply be dumped. Not only would that be illegal, but whey decomposition is toxic to the natural environment, robbing oxygen from streams and rivers. That could turn a waterway into what one expert calls a “dead sea,” destroying aquatic life over potentially large areas. Spills of cheese whey, a cousin of Greek yogurt whey, have killed tens of thousands of fish around the country in recent years.

The scale of the problem—or opportunity, depending on who you ask—is daunting. The $2 billion Greek yogurt market has become one of the biggest success stories in food over the past few years and total yogurt production in New York nearly tripled between 2007 and 2013. New plants continue to open all over the country. The Northeast alone, led by New York, produced more than 150 million gallons of acid whey last year, according to one estimate.


On the plus side, it looks like there might be some viable uses for whey that might end up in play in the next five or ten years. But not so much right now.
rabble
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