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Hooking Up Your Next-Gen Console To The Internet

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Hooking Up Your Next-Gen Console To The Internet

Postby MadMind » Mon Oct 01, 2007 2:50 am

I have a stupid question.

My (cable) internet connection is across the room. I have the modem connected to the PC via ethernet cable. Say I purchased an Xbox 360 and wanted to take it online by running an ethernet cable to it. How would I go about it?
Thing is, the cable goes directly into the modem, and I've found out the hard way that if there are any more breaks in the cable (aka splitter) the signal gets real iffy. (Is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter?)
There is only one output from the modem and I wouldn't want to run a line from the PC modem to the 360 - having to turn on the modem across the room - not being able to use the 360 and the PC online simultaneously - and besides the 360 has a built-in modem. So I suppose that wouldn't make much sense.

Say you're taking the same line of cable (post it's initial split into numerous locations of the house) and split that particular line and run it both to the PC and 360 - could you use them both online at the same time?

I don't know why this confuses me so badly, but it does.
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Postby Beer Moon » Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:38 am

What you want is a router, which is an ethernet "splitter". Your local electronics store has tons of them. I use a cheap-o D-Link router that my buddy gave to me when he upgraded to a better one. I use it for my PC, Xbox, and HD-DVD player.

Your cable modem typically has 1 IP address - this is an internet address that allows your machine to send and receive data from other computers on the internet - just like a regular address does for snail mail.

The router can take that one address and assign internal addresses for the devices in your home that no one else can see. It then routes all the traffic through the "public" address that your modem has, so that all of the devices in your home get a chance to talk to the outside world.
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Postby MadMind » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:16 pm

Thanks, I was wondering if maybe I'd need to get a router.
Do you need to turn your modem on for the internet to go through to the router? And why do you need your HD-DVD player to be connected to the internet?
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Postby fisticuffs » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:21 pm

You need help.
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Postby MadMind » Mon Oct 01, 2007 5:45 pm

fisticuffs wrote:You need help.

I know right? Funny thing is, believe it or not, is that I'm really good with A/V connections and figuring out ways to split & combine & run things to different places. But for whatever reason, splitting broadband really confuses me. I've never had to do it before, so it's new ground.
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Postby Beer Moon » Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:20 pm

MadMind wrote:Thanks, I was wondering if maybe I'd need to get a router.
Do you need to turn your modem on for the internet to go through to the router? And why do you need your HD-DVD player to be connected to the internet?


Yes your modem still has to be turned on and plugged into the router.

My HD-DVD player gets firmware updates and also has features on HD-DVDs that are online-enabled. I have only used it to get updates so far. Knocked Up was locking up at 1:20:19 until I updated to the latest firmware. Now it plays through fine.
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Postby MadMind » Mon Oct 01, 2007 10:45 pm

I don't know it just seemed simpler back when I hooked up my Dreamcast with our 56k phone-line connection. I didn't have to put it through the PC's modem, and furthermore didn't have to press a button across the room to have a signal go through.
If the 360 has it's own modem, why do I have to put it through the cable modem? Just so I can have it come out the other end as an ethernet connection?
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Postby MadMind » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:14 pm

Don't they make surge protectors with ethernet inputs/outputs? If so, if you're only going to split your internet connection two ways, wouldn't it be cheaper to acquire a surge protector rather than a router?
And if no surge protectors have ethernet input/outputs, why don't they?
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Postby fisticuffs » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:21 pm

Can somebody help this guy please? First please stop saying Modem. You have a broadband signal coming into your house via cable or DSL. right now it goes to your "Modem" and then to your computer. You need to send it to a Router which will "split" it two more than one source your computer and your Xbox. It's completely unlike splitting an analog audio signal. This can also be done by buying a wireless router and the wireless network adapter for you Xbox. A lot more costly and slightly slower but no cables mucking up the place. Please also ignore all the talk of firmware upgrades and HD DVD players. Doesn't pertain to your question at all. Thats it. Outside of whatever software hoops you have to jump through. Forget the idea of the surge protector just buy a plain and simple router that is compatible with your xbox. I think most of them should be that are out now.
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Postby Beer Moon » Tue Oct 02, 2007 9:46 pm

fisticuffs wrote:Can somebody help this guy please? First please stop saying Modem. You have a broadband signal coming into your house via cable or DSL. right now it goes to your "Modem" and then to your computer. You need to send it to a Router which will "split" it two more than one source your computer and your Xbox. It's completely unlike splitting an analog audio signal. This can also be done by buying a wireless router and the wireless network adapter for you Xbox. A lot more costly and slightly slower but no cables mucking up the place. Please also ignore all the talk of firmware upgrades and HD DVD players. Doesn't pertain to your question at all. Thats it. Outside of whatever software hoops you have to jump through. Forget the idea of the surge protector just buy a plain and simple router that is compatible with your xbox. I think most of them should be that are out now.


I suspect it's a ruse. This guy has access to the internet just like anyone else, so if he really wanted to know about computers, he could go to Google and get these questions answered. If he was able to figure out how to write an address on an envelope in order to get his mail delivered to the right place, and that he has to dial a different phone number to reach a different person, then he's capable of understanding that his computer has a thing such as an IP address and that he needs a router in order to connect more than one internet device to his cable modem.
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Postby MadMind » Wed Oct 03, 2007 12:51 am

Beer Moon wrote:I suspect it's a ruse.

That's the funny thing, totally not a ruse.
For some reason I just can't wrap my head around it. What if you had several computers in different parts of the house? Ok, I get it, just one IP address per household per line. But would you need a cable modem per PC? Say if your cable modem is on one floor and a secondary computer is on another. See I turn my cable modem on/off when not in use. I suppose you guys just leave yours turned on all the time?

Thanks for the wireless suggestion fisticuffs. Just how much slower/less reliable can a wireless router be?
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Postby paulie » Wed Oct 03, 2007 12:46 pm

this topic is generally a bit too complex to explain on an internet forum, especially for a newbie.

this may be a good start for basic concepts:
http://tinyurl.com/3aup8s
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Postby fisticuffs » Wed Oct 03, 2007 12:54 pm

One Cable modem a router to send it to several devices. You should never have to turn your modem off when not in use. The only time you do that is occasionally if your service isn't working you reset it by cutting the power and then putting it back on. Very simply buy a router.
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Postby MadMind » Wed Oct 03, 2007 11:42 pm

fisticuffs wrote:You should never have to turn your modem off when not in use.

No point in leaving it on when you're not accessing the internet (not talking about unplugging it). Why waste the electricity?
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Postby mcs_madison » Mon Oct 08, 2007 8:49 am

MadMind wrote:
fisticuffs wrote:You should never have to turn your modem off when not in use.

No point in leaving it on when you're not accessing the internet (not talking about unplugging it). Why waste the electricity?


Doesn't hurt to turn it off, but if you're an internet addict, that 30 sec of boot time is a killer. ;-) Always turn the modem on before you turn on the router, so it has time to get an IP, before the Router pings it for one.

The ethernet signal from the cable modem will be split by the router, much like a power strip does for electricity. However, you're distributing data packets, not electricity, hence the need for the router. Now you can route the signal to several components, thus sharing the bandwidth of the single cable modem connection, and like amperage on an electrical circuit it's finite. If you're only using one thing at a time, you'll have no problems with speed, but if you're doing some serious downloading, the other connections will be slower.

Wireless connections tend to be about 1/2 as fast as a wired connection due to signal loss, but it's fast enough for most people. I play a couple of on-line games over a wireless connection, and it's just fine.

The cable company supplies you with a unique "global" IP address to the outside world for your Modem, the router creates unique IP addresses for your internal connections, that it can map back to the cable modem IP address, keeping data organized and sent to the correct connection.

That's how it knows that it's the PC downloading music and the X-box uploading gamer statistics and sends the data to the right place.
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