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Malapropisms that need stopped

If it doesn't fit anywhere else, it fits here

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:28 pm

TheBookPolice wrote: I say that "RBI" has become a word in its own right, like "OK" or "ASAP" (for better or worse in those cases).
Nonsense. OK and ASAP are in common usage - RBI is jargon specific to one very narrow field. Note to sports fans: Not everyone is a sports fan.

Regardless, all your tap-dancing seems pretty pointless when it is (and, to my ears, sounds) correct to simply say "he has multiple RBI." No bastardization needed. Would you make a similar concession for "pluralizing" RPM - a word MUCH more common than RBI? I hope not, since it makes no sense.

On a completely unrelated note, I've become increasingly irritated by the complete turnaround in the meaning of the phrase "thank you." It used to be a polite expression of appreciativeness. Now, apparently, it's some sort of demand: "Thank you for not smoking." Fuck you for not having the balls to just say "smoking not allowed."
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Postby magic moose » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:45 pm

TheBookPolice wrote:I say that "RBI" has become a word in its own right, like "OK" or "ASAP" (for better or worse in those cases).


I'm going to start using the phase "ASAP as possible" and start lengthening OK to it's original Old Kinderhook.
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Postby white_rabbit » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:50 pm

Just so we're all on the same page "RBI" stands for "Republican Butt Intrusion", right?
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Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:51 pm

magic moose wrote: OK to it's original Old Kinderhook.
Actually, OK was originally an abbreviation for "oll korrect", a purposeful misspelling of "all correct".

BTW - I've been purposely putting my commas and periods outside of quotation marks for years, even though I am well aware it is incorrect. Why? Because the correct way is stupid. For example, if I'm listing song titles thusly: "Tie A Yellow Ribbon 'Round The Ole Oak Tree", "Precious and Few", "Brand New Key" and "In The Year 2525", I am completely baffled why it's "correct" to include punctuation inside the quotations when the punctuation has not one damn thing to do with the title in question. I don't know what the logic is for including punctuation inside quotation marks, but I'm gonna do everything in my power to change it!
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Re: Malapropisms that need stopped

Postby magic moose » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:53 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:"Quick" originally meant "alive" - the moment when a mother first felt her baby kick was called "the quickening."


Sounds like an historical case for abortion beyond the first trimester. Slippery biblical pro-choicers.
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Postby Henry Vilas » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:56 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:BTW - I've been purposely putting my commas and periods outside of quotation marks for years, even though I am well aware it is incorrect. Why? Because the correct way is stupid. For example, if I'm listing song titles thusly: "Tie A Yellow Ribbon 'Round The Ole Oak Tree", "Precious and Few", "Brand New Key" and "In The Year 2525", I am completely baffled why it's "correct" to include punctuation inside the quotations when the punctuation has not one damn thing to do with the title in question. I don't know what the logic is for including punctuation inside quotation marks, but I'm gonna do everything in my power to change it!

I had this same discussion in the past with Chuck Schick (who used to be our resident grammarian). He agreed with that sentiment, but said convention overruled logic.
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Postby fennel » Fri Aug 31, 2007 2:58 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:[BTW - I've been purposely putting my commas and periods outside of quotation marks for years, even though I am well aware it is incorrect. Why? Because the correct way is stupid.

No kidding. I tried explaining the (English) convention to a French friend who was utterly baffled by it. I think it has it's origin in typography. It was thought to be more visually appleaing, perhaps. But silly, still!
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Postby white_rabbit » Fri Aug 31, 2007 3:00 pm

Henry Vilas wrote:
Prof. Wagstaff wrote:BTW - I've been purposely putting my commas and periods outside of quotation marks for years, even though I am well aware it is incorrect. Why? Because the correct way is stupid. For example, if I'm listing song titles thusly: "Tie A Yellow Ribbon 'Round The Ole Oak Tree", "Precious and Few", "Brand New Key" and "In The Year 2525", I am completely baffled why it's "correct" to include punctuation inside the quotations when the punctuation has not one damn thing to do with the title in question. I don't know what the logic is for including punctuation inside quotation marks, but I'm gonna do everything in my power to change it!

I had this same discussion in the past with Chuck Schick (who used to be our resident grammarian). He agreed with that sentiment, but said convention overruled logic.


I've always included commas and periods outside the "quotes" and always will and I really do not recall ever being 'dinged' in college for doing so.
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Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Fri Aug 31, 2007 3:10 pm

Henry Vilas wrote:
I had this same discussion in the past with Chuck Schick (who used to be our resident grammarian). He agreed with that sentiment, but said convention overruled logic.
Bah!
"Convention and Chuck Schick can both go fuck themselves!" shouted Prof. Wagstaff, as "One Hippopotami", a popular song by Allan Sherman, played softly in the background.
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Postby Kenneth Burns » Fri Aug 31, 2007 3:31 pm

Back in my programming days a coworker ridiculed one of my usual spaghetti code monstrosities as a "card of decks."
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Postby dstol62 » Fri Aug 31, 2007 4:31 pm

"Actually" is my least favorite beginning to any sentence. "Be that as it may" runs close second.
"That having been said" is a distant third.
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Postby Bwis53 » Fri Aug 31, 2007 8:33 pm

Everytime I hear that term, I think of Norm Crosby. That was his schtick.

My favorite is my own. During my harried housewife, mom, business days, I was writing out the grocery list. We used a lot of Handy Wipes. I mis-wrote: Handy Wife.

At work, I was listing field offices, and I mis-wrote: Steven's Pint.

My favorite minister once mis-spoke: Daily prayer and medication.
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Postby TheBookPolice » Fri Aug 31, 2007 11:20 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:
TheBookPolice wrote: I say that "RBI" has become a word in its own right, like "OK" or "ASAP" (for better or worse in those cases).
Nonsense. OK and ASAP are in common usage - RBI is jargon specific to one very narrow field. Note to sports fans: Not everyone is a sports fan.

Regardless, all your tap-dancing seems pretty pointless when it is (and, to my ears, sounds) correct to simply say "he has multiple RBI." No bastardization needed. Would you make a similar concession for "pluralizing" RPM - a word MUCH more common than RBI? I hope not, since it makes no sense.

Note to vinyl fans: Not everyone has a turntable.

(Yeah, I know it's got more applications than just audiophilia.)

In a perfect world, yes, RBI would be flexible enough to stand as a singular or plural. However, it's going to continue to be used as its own word by a group of people (no matter how small you find it to be); if that's the case, RBIs makes more sense than RsBI.
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Postby fennel » Fri Aug 31, 2007 11:51 pm

TheBookPolice wrote:
Prof. Wagstaff wrote:
TheBookPolice wrote: I say that "RBI" has become a word in its own right, like "OK" or "ASAP" (for better or worse in those cases).
Nonsense. OK and ASAP are in common usage - RBI is jargon specific to one very narrow field. Note to sports fans: Not everyone is a sports fan.

Regardless, all your tap-dancing seems pretty pointless when it is (and, to my ears, sounds) correct to simply say "he has multiple RBI." No bastardization needed. Would you make a similar concession for "pluralizing" RPM - a word MUCH more common than RBI? I hope not, since it makes no sense.

Note to vinyl fans: Not everyone has a turntable.

(Yeah, I know it's got more applications than just audiophilia.)

In a perfect world, yes, RBI would be flexible enough to stand as a singular or plural. However, it's going to continue to be used as its own word by a group of people (no matter how small you find it to be); if that's the case, RBIs makes more sense than RsBI.


It's a matter of usage. Common usage eventually becomes accepted usage, no matter how seemingly nonsensical it is. That doesn't mean we need to blithely hasten its acceptance. The tension is healthy, I think.

"Real good," for example, is widely accepted as correct now, though, for me, it conjures chewing tobacco and STP. (Do you mean "really good" or "real [and] good"?) The Brits cling to the ungrammatical pluralizing of singular nouns in some cases. ("Microsoft are ..." or "The University of Wisconsin are ...") But in UK English, that's correct usage, ghastly as it seems. Perhaps this is an artifact stemming from the royal We. In any case, I'm just sure it was a primary cause for the decline of the Empire ...
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Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Sat Sep 01, 2007 1:02 am

dstol62 wrote:"Actually" is my least favorite beginning to any sentence.

Is there an emoticon for doing that Rodney Dangerfield thing with your tie?
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