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Old Fashioned Press?

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Old Fashioned Press?

Postby shyguy » Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:29 pm

A friend was asked to make someone a brandy old fashioned "press" - this was new to him, and to me. Old fashioned "sweet", obviously, we'd heard of. He muddled through, doing nothing different, and got no negative reaction from the polite guest. What should he have mixed up here? Anyone know what is meant by an old fashioned "press"??
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby Bunny Chow » Tue Dec 30, 2008 2:05 pm

My memory is foggy so I might be wrong here but I believe a press is made with club soda.

The "press" refers to the soda gun, at least that's how I remember it.

It's been a long time since I've tended bar.
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby Scotty » Tue Dec 30, 2008 2:15 pm

Borrowed from the allexperts dot com site.


I have the time today to follw-up and give you a little history on the Presbyterian Highball.
The original drink is not an alcoholic beverage at all, it's just soda. I think it goes back about 50 years or so. When people were having "parties" and neighbors were invited, there was always a few Presbyters and/or non-drinkers that were invited too. Presbyters do not consume alcohol,coffee,blah,blah,blah. So, to be social, someone( I suspect a Bartender) came up with a mix of Ginger Ale and Club Soda that "looked" like a Rye and Soda. That way they could hang at the party and "blend" with something that looked like a drink yet not consume Alcohol. If you make one of these N/A drinks some time and set it next to a 7&7 or Rye & Ginger, you'll see how much they look alike.
Somewhere along the line a partier must have gotten one of those by accident and just added some Rye Whisky to "improve" it,lol. Thus we have the Presbyterian Highball! And, as I'm sure you've been able to figure out, it's a less sweet drink than a Rye and Ginger is.
You'll find that most people that order one will simply say; "I'll have a Press/Presbyterian please" or "I'll have a Rye Press/Presbyterian please". And, most often it'll be someone a little more "mature" than a 20-something.
Ok Jarod, I'm feeling better now that I've given you the rest of this answer. I'm sorry I didn't have much time yesterday.
I'm looking forward to hearing from you at http://www.askyourbartender.com soon.



Here's looking forward to talking to you again soon,
Cheers,
Dave
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby fisticuffs » Tue Dec 30, 2008 2:23 pm

it sounds tastier than the Episcopalian Martini I invented.
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby Steven Van Haren » Tue Dec 30, 2008 2:33 pm

'Press' refers to pressing soda water onto the liquor with 7-Up. A press drink is not mixed merely with 7-Up, nor merely Soda, but instead with equal amounts of both.

Therefore, in order to make an Old Fashioned Press, and I'm sure I'm preaching to the choir by describing from the beginning, involves muddling a cherry, an orange slice and a cube of sugar moistened by bitters, pouring over the muddle 2oz of your preferred brown liquor, filling the glass with ice, subsequently pouring both 7-Up and Soda to top off the drink. An Old Fashioned is regularly garnished with a cherry and an orange together, but is often garnished by an olive. Usually it is unnecessary to ask about the garnish, as an Old Fashioned drinking-olive eater will usually go out of their way to specify their garnish when ordering.

Image
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby shyguy » Wed Dec 31, 2008 6:33 pm

Thanks to all for the tips. I'm spending time with this pal tonight, maybe I can get him to whip up a few "Pres" old fashioneds while we're watching Dick Clark :)
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby joey » Fri Jan 02, 2009 1:52 am

from my many years of bartending and many locations and many drink consumptions over the years, regionally speaking, press is 1/2 7up or sprite and half soda water.
The internet is only about half helpful when asking it questions about drinks. Alcoholic drink names, ingredients, amounts, etc vary greatly by region.
For example, if you order an old fashioned in Wisconsin, 99% of the time it will be made with brandy (unless specified otherwise). Most any other states will make it with bourbon.
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby narcoleptish » Sat Jan 03, 2009 12:48 pm

When I was bartending I always used joey's recipe but my understanding of the origins of the name was the presbyterian version. Everything is probably partially right.

The press is one of those drinks that you get a different version of practically everywhere you order it. Order one at a TGI fridays type of place and the bartender will nod slowly and say okaaay, then wander over to another employee and try to slyly whisper for instructions. The other employee will glance over at you and give a shrug. A book might be dug out from under the counter. By this time you should just change your order to a beer.

I like vodka collins and I get them different every time. Vanessa at Maduro makes them best.
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby misterlinguistr » Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:41 pm

I agree with Joey regarding relying on the internet. Better off just asking an expert. Head to W. Main St.
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Re: Old Fashioned Press?

Postby Hank_Venison » Thu Jan 08, 2009 4:22 pm

shyguy wrote:A friend was asked to make someone a brandy old fashioned "press" - this was new to him, and to me. Old fashioned "sweet", obviously, we'd heard of. He muddled through, doing nothing different, and got no negative reaction from the polite guest. What should he have mixed up here? Anyone know what is meant by an old fashioned "press"??


Where does your friend work, and how long has he been there?
Has he really never had anyone else order, say...a vodka press?
Every bartender should know that a press is half 7-up (which is what "sweet" refers to) & 1/2 soda water.
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