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To Kill a Turkey

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To Kill a Turkey

Postby jjoyce » Tue Nov 27, 2007 4:50 pm

This article by Bill Lueders has been getting big hits, despite coming out in the pre-Thanksgiving paper. But I'm surprised it hasn't generated much online discussion. Anyone care to weigh in?
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Postby narcoleptish » Tue Nov 27, 2007 5:45 pm

Good article. Slowly but surely I am being turned towards organics and every time I read about factory animal production I turn a little more. The descriptions of turkeys growing too big, too fast, to stand, and the mutilation as chicks, made me sit and stare and try to imagine that short life. Every time I drive up 51 and see that ever-expanding veal operation just south of Leeds and the quaint little tupperware huts they live out their lives in, I remind myself to never even consider ordering it. I swore off Woodman's meat over a year ago, not that I ever ate much. I think this story will have me off of restaurant chicken for good.

I like how the amish farmer is both helping society, by raising organic poultry, and hurting it, by fathering fifteen kids.

(I had said "fifteen fucking kids" but the kids weren't the target of my derision, it was the number of them.
Last edited by narcoleptish on Tue Nov 27, 2007 11:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby TAsunder » Tue Nov 27, 2007 6:15 pm

Meh. I've never bought the logic that if I eat meat I ought to participate in the slaughter. I don't follow the garbageman around, help deliver furniture at best buy, work on an oil platform, make my own clothes, or many other things. I have a decent understanding of the process, enough to know that I don't want to participate.

The most interesting parts to me were the pricing and the notion that his kid could eat the farm-raised turkey but not a normal turkey due to additive allergies.

I myself bought a heritage turkey from JenEhr. It was ridiculously expensive compared to grocery store prices. Though perhaps moderately tastier than a "normal" turkey, the price is not justified by the taste. By personal ethics and a preference to buy local, maybe, but not just on taste alone.

Now the french apple pie I got from Cafe Soleil, on the other hand, was well worth the price. Best. Pie. Ever.
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Postby Galoot » Tue Nov 27, 2007 6:29 pm

Definitely a good article, and it provided some of the inspiration for me to go to Ruegsegger's in Paoli on Friday, where I bought a cut-up organic free-range chicken among other things. The owner of the store hadn't read the article yet.

I was puzzled by one thing--why is it considered "more humane" to cut a turkey's throat, through its open mouth? The poor bird dies from a combination of bleeding to death (fairly humane) and drowning on its own blood (cruel). Why not just chop off the head? The guy at Ruegsegger's claimed that PETA thinks that beheadings are inhumane. Too bad for PETA. For someone lacking a fancy electric turkey stunning machine, a simple beheading seems by far to be the most humane way to kill a turkey.

As for the free-range chicken I bought--yes, it is far tastier than a bird from Cub's, so much so that I find the increased price justified by taste alone. The moral benefits just help the calculus, in my opinion.
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Postby Henry Vilas » Tue Nov 27, 2007 6:37 pm

Galoot wrote:Definitely a good article, and it provided some of the inspiration for me to go to Ruegsegger's in Paoli on Friday, where I bought a cut-up organic free-range chicken among other things.

Locally, Jacobson's also sells Amish free-range chicken.
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Postby donges » Tue Nov 27, 2007 10:11 pm

I made the mistake of reading the article just after I put the turkey in the oven (even after reading Vince's warning to wait).
I had a passing thought to cancel the whole day and break out the rice and beans.
Certainly made me decide to try to do more organic or even reduce meat consumption by a substantial amount.
Then two nights later I was watching Bizarre Foods on the Travel channel and the guy was eating chicken uteruses! Took me even more towards writing off meat and meat by-products.
Then I remembered how much I like bacon.

I do agree that killing my own meat is not necessary. In the urban environment, how are you gonna do that anyway? But if I was hungry enough, would I? Of course. And so would you.
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Postby sylvie » Wed Nov 28, 2007 3:36 am

narcoleptish wrote:
I like how the amish farmer is both helping society, by raising organic poultry, and hurting it, by fathering fifteen kids.

(I had said "fifteen fucking kids" but the kids weren't the target of my derision, it was the number of them.


The Amish are also big puppy millers.
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Postby narcoleptish » Wed Nov 28, 2007 10:06 am

sylvie wrote: The Amish are also big puppy millers.


They have this image as simple gentle folk, but there are shrewd and underhanded amish just like any other group. A friend bought a large farm in Hillsboro with amish neighbors. The farm had been vacant for awhile and had several large freshly cut stumps on it. He also found many tall straight trees with string tied around them, supposedly a mark by the amish for trees they intend to harvest. Gotta keep up with the demand of those huge amish furniture stores.

"This is the dining set we got over at the amish outlet, the salesman said it was made by a gentleman named Abner Stoltzfus and delivered to the store in a buggy!"
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Re:

Postby koberonn » Tue Sep 08, 2009 5:55 am

narcoleptish wrote:
sylvie wrote: The Amish are also big puppy millers.


They have this image as simple gentle folk, but there are shrewd and underhanded amish just like any other group. A friend bought a large farm in Hillsboro with amish neighbors. The farm had been vacant for awhile and had several large freshly cut stumps on it. He also found many tall straight trees with string tied around them, supposedly a mark by the amish for trees they intend to harvest. Gotta keep up with the demand of those huge amish furniture stores.

"This is the dining set we got over at the amish outlet, the salesman said it was made by a gentleman named Abner Stoltzfus and delivered to the store in a buggy!"


i think you made a good dining here, keep it up, be safe..


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