MOBILE USERS: m.isthmus.com
Connect with Isthmus on Twitter · Facebook · Flickr · Newsletters · Instagram 
Saturday, September 20, 2014 |  Madison, WI: 72.0° F  Mostly Cloudy
Collapse Photo Bar

Soup recipes

Grocery stores, recipes, cook books, CSAs, farmers' markets, organic, local, processed, corporate. It's a smorgabord!

Re: Soup recipes

Postby Lily » Sat Dec 10, 2011 7:39 pm

city2countrygal wrote:Senate Bean Soup on the website for the U.S. Senate has a recipe for a 5 gallon batch. Wow that's a lot of soup!

The recipe has been around since approx. 1903, and it's served every day in the Senate's restaurant. Thanks for the heads up on that one Ttusker! I will make it for sure, but probably not 5 gallons. :lol:


Never knew this existed. Good post and thanks! Although I think I'll tame the recipe down to four servings. Looks like some good cold weather comfort food!!
Lily
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 929
Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby city2countrygal » Sat Dec 10, 2011 11:42 pm

msnflyer wrote:Now you've got me hungry for cream of poblano soup. Since I made chicken stock today and have cream in the fridge...

Mexican crema would be an authentic cream to use, and poblanos are one of my favorite peppers. I'm always happy when they produce well in the garden for that year! Care to share a recipe msnflyer?
city2countrygal
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 507
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2010 12:43 pm
Location: ???

Re: Soup recipes

Postby msnflyer » Sun Dec 11, 2011 6:41 am

city2countrygal wrote:
msnflyer wrote:Now you've got me hungry for cream of poblano soup. Since I made chicken stock today and have cream in the fridge...

Mexican crema would be an authentic cream to use, and poblanos are one of my favorite peppers. I'm always happy when they produce well in the garden for that year! Care to share a recipe msnflyer?


Well, if it was a authentic Mexican soup :wink: The recipe's from a restaurant near Houston. Will share, have to get the recipe out.
msnflyer
Forum Addict
 
Posts: 383
Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2003 9:22 am

Re: Soup recipes

Postby city2countrygal » Wed Dec 14, 2011 5:04 pm

I have family in the Houston area, can you please share the name of the restaurant too, msnflyer? One of my very first vacations, I was prob. 2 years old, was to the Johnson Space Center. Very cool!

Love of peppers leads me to another reason for this reply ...
I love them but never learn my lesson about getting the acid on my fingers. Just today I was making chili and it happened again. I think it was from the dried peppers I rehydrated. The first time I was totally ignorant of the power of the mighty habanero and decided to cut some up for nachos after bar time (college days) and got wicked acid burn, even in my eyes and on my contacts. You would think after that I would know better!

Anyone have a suggestion for avoiding pepper acid burn? Disposable plastic gloves are probably the best bet, but I was trying to think of something more eco-friendly.
city2countrygal
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 507
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2010 12:43 pm
Location: ???

Re: Soup recipes

Postby NullDevice » Thu Dec 15, 2011 9:53 am

JG Vongerichten's first cookbook "Cooking at Home with a 4-star Chef" has some excellent and very simple soup recipes that I find myself going to often. The parsley soup - chicken stock, simmered with bundled parsley stems (which are then removed), potatoes and sliced mushrooms (and then garnished with a crapton of fresh parsley before serving) is lovely, the garlic soup is fantastic (but will make your home smell like garlic for weeks, becasue it uses like 2 cups of garlic cloves), and despite the fact that it's a pain in the ass to juice a bunch of cucumbers sufficiently, the cold cucmber soup with lime is a fantastic summer dish (cuke juice, nam pla, lime, chili, lemongrass).

I once made a very rustic soup, can't remember where I got the recipe exactly, that was basically just water, garlic and prosciutto (okay, that part is not exactly rustic, but hey, air-dried cured meat kinda is) as the stock, thickened with stale bread. It was deeply old-school peasant food and it was wonderful. I'd imagine it's a great base for a zillion things.

Also, re: the pepper burn. Yeah, gloves are your best bet. Capsaicin isn't an acid, so it can't be neutralized easily, but it is fat-soluble so a good dish soap (takes grease out of your way!) can do wonders (and is less off-putting than rubbing your hands with sour cream). Also I've heard rubbing alcohol (or vodka) can help wash it off but I haven't tried that. Yet.
NullDevice
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 738
Joined: Fri May 02, 2003 2:53 pm
Location: Madison, WI

Re: Soup recipes

Postby city2countrygal » Fri Dec 16, 2011 12:51 pm

Thank you, NullDevice, for the stock bases and Vongerichten's book recommendation. I previewed it on google books and the recipes look right up my alley. I'm prone to get a few new cookbooks this time of year, and I have a nice list so far!

I will probably stock up on gloves the next time I hit my my fav east-side restaurant supply store. :)
city2countrygal
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 507
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2010 12:43 pm
Location: ???

Re: Soup recipes

Postby anaranjado » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:10 pm

I just made this one tonight. It is really good, especially with the addition of bacon bits:

Bender's Chickpea and Leek Soup (from Jamie Oliver)

4-5 leeks, washed, yellow and light green part only
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 cups chickpeas (I use 2 cans, drained and rinsed)
5 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup grated parmesan
olive oil
1-2 Tablespoons butter
1 Tablespoon fresh thyme (I use 1 teaspoon dried)
3 Tablespoons fresh parsley
Crispy bacon bits

Clean and slice leeks into ringlets.
Melt butter and olive oil in stock pot, add garlic.
When garlic softens, add leeks.
Add half of the broth and chickpeas
Give a few whizzes of immersion blender so that half of the chickpeas remain whole. (This step is completely optional).
Add the rest of broth, bring to boil.
Add parmesan, thyme, parsley and salt and pepper
Reduce heat and simmer at least 15-20 minutes.
Top with crispy bacon bits to serve (if desired)

This soup is very quick and easy and tastes so good!
anaranjado
Senior Member
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 1:15 pm

Re: Soup recipes

Postby city2countrygal » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:30 pm

Thanks, anaranjado, that one does look good! Great combo, chickpeas and leeks! It is now in my recipe file.

Speaking of The Naked Chef, have any forons used his products?
I was always eyeing up the flavour shaker, but usually get away with my mortar and pestle or the coffee grinder I reserve for spices. I'm curious if anyone has used it, as well as general the quality of his products. I'm not a really a fan of the celeb-chef products and like to stick to the tried-and-true favs (with the exception of gadgets).

Image
city2countrygal
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 507
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2010 12:43 pm
Location: ???

Re: Soup recipes

Postby Lily » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:43 pm

NullDevice wrote:....Also, re: the pepper burn. Yeah, gloves are your best bet. Capsaicin isn't an acid, so it can't be neutralized easily, but it is fat-soluble so a good dish soap (takes grease out of your way!) can do wonders (and is less off-putting than rubbing your hands with sour cream). Also I've heard rubbing alcohol (or vodka) can help wash it off but I haven't tried that. Yet.


I second using good dish soap, LOTS, and if you have longer finger nails make sure you clean underneath the nail. Little bits of pepper oil is powerful stuff and can soak in near your nail and underneath. I don't bother with latex gloves if I'm just cutting and cleaning jalapeno's, serrano's, or cayenne peppers but if you're going habenero or hotter get the gloves. I once grew some gorgeous habenero peppers--pretty little bright orange lantern shapes! But after I started cutting into the second or third ripened fruit my eyes started to water, my nose started to run, I was gagging and had to go to an open window. The rest of my crop was given away to braver souls than I.
Lily
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 929
Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby Lily » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:24 pm

Does anyone not crave Wisconsin Beer Cheese Soup, at least once in a while? It's so fattening it could be your meal for the day but it's worth it. Especially if you make special choices for the beer and cheese that's added. Preferably a Wisconsin micro-brew beer. Dark beer works, but IPA's or fruit flavored beers won't work here. I know, it's a sacrifice of drinking pleasure but your soup will be delicious. Just think: one for the soup, one for the cook. You don't have to go gourmet with the cheese either but please make it a Wisconsin cheddar. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy a block of cheese and shred it yourself but sometimes the shredded costs the same.

I know there are a lot of different recipes for this soup. My recipe follows:

Wisconsin-style Beer Cheese Soup
Serves 4
Ingredients
• 1 cup finely diced carrots
• 3/4 cup diced onion
• 3/4 cup diced celery
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• 1 T extra virgin olive oil
• ½ t hot cayenne pepper powder
• 1/8 t black pepper
• 1-1/2 cups chicken broth (low-sodium or home-made)
• 1 12-oz bottle Wisconsin micro-brew beer
• 3 T salt free butter
• 2 T flour
• 2 cups whole milk
• 3 cups shredded sharp Wisconsin Cheddar cheese
• 1-1/2 t Dijon mustard
• 1 t Worcestershire sauce
• 1/2 t dry mustard

In a large saucepan over medium heat, stir together carrots, onion, celery, and garlic in olive oil. Sautee for 5 minutes on medium heat. Stir in hot cayenne pepper, and black pepper. Pour in chicken broth and beer; simmer until vegetables are tender, about 12 minutes. Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, heat butter in a large soup pot over medium-high heat. Stir in flour with a wire whisk; cook, stirring until the flour is light brown, about 3 or 4 minutes. Gradually stir in milk, whisking to prevent scorching, until thickened. Remove from heat. Stir in cheese a little at a time. Keep warm.

Stir chicken broth and beer mixture into cheese mixture. Stir in Dijon mustard, Worcestershire sauce, and dry mustard. Adjust for your seasonings. Bring to a simmer on L-O-W, and cook 10 minutes. Keep an eye on it and stir frequently because milk and cheese burn quickly.
Lily
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 929
Joined: Tue Jan 11, 2005 11:02 pm
Location: Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby fennel » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:22 am

Lily wrote:You don't have to go gourmet with the cheese either but please make it a Wisconsin cheddar. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy a block of cheese and shred it yourself but sometimes the shredded costs the same.
Here, I differ, though the recipe looks enticing. The cheese ought to be real, flavorful cheese if this is to be a special occasion. And generic orange-colored block cheese isn't worth the effort. Or orange-colored anything, for that matter. The best value I've found so far is the Cabot cheddar at Trailer Joe's. That's from Vermont, yes, but I doubt you'll find anything as good from Wisconsin at twice the price.
(Not that I don't expect Wisconsin will eventually catch up, mind you.)
fennel
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 3173
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:24 pm
Location: Inside the Green Zone, Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby fennel » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:22 am

Lily wrote:You don't have to go gourmet with the cheese either but please make it a Wisconsin cheddar. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy a block of cheese and shred it yourself but sometimes the shredded costs the same.
Here, I differ, though the recipe looks enticing. The cheese ought to be real, flavorful cheese if this is to be a special occasion. And generic orange-colored block cheese isn't worth the effort. Or orange-colored anything, for that matter. The best value I've found so far is the Cabot cheddar at Trailer Joe's. That's from Vermont, yes, but I doubt you'll find anything as good from Wisconsin at half the price.
(Not that I don't expect Wisconsin will eventually catch up, mind you.)
fennel
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 3173
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:24 pm
Location: Inside the Green Zone, Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby fennel » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:22 am

Lily wrote:You don't have to go gourmet with the cheese either but please make it a Wisconsin cheddar. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy a block of cheese and shred it yourself but sometimes the shredded costs the same.
Here, I differ, though the recipe looks enticing. The cheese ought to be real, flavorful cheese if this is to be a special occasion. And generic orange-colored block cheese isn't worth the effort. Or orange-colored anything, for that matter. The best value I've found so far is the Cabot cheddar at Trailer Joe's. That's from Vermont, yes, but I doubt you'll find anything as good from Wisconsin at twice the price.
(Not that I don't expect Wisconsin will eventually catch up, mind you.)
fennel
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 3173
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:24 pm
Location: Inside the Green Zone, Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby fennel » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:22 am

Lily wrote:You don't have to go gourmet with the cheese either but please make it a Wisconsin cheddar. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy a block of cheese and shred it yourself but sometimes the shredded costs the same.
Here, I differ, though the recipe looks enticing. The cheese ought to be real, flavorful cheese if this is to be a special occasion. And generic orange-colored block cheese isn't worth the effort. Or orange-colored anything, for that matter. The best value I've found so far is the Cabot cheddar at Trailer Joe's. That's from Vermont, yes, but I doubt you'll find anything as good from Wisconsin at twice the price.
(Not that I don't expect Wisconsin will eventually catch up, mind you.)
fennel
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 3173
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:24 pm
Location: Inside the Green Zone, Madison

Re: Soup recipes

Postby fennel » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:23 am

Lily wrote:You don't have to go gourmet with the cheese either but please make it a Wisconsin cheddar. Sometimes it's cheaper to buy a block of cheese and shred it yourself but sometimes the shredded costs the same.
Here, I differ, though the recipe looks enticing. The cheese ought to be real, flavorful cheese if this is to be a special occasion. And generic orange-colored block cheese isn't worth the effort. Or orange-colored anything, for that matter. The best value I've found so far is the Cabot cheddar at Trailer Joe's. That's from Vermont, yes, but I doubt you'll find anything as good from Wisconsin at twice the price.
(Not that I don't expect Wisconsin will eventually catch up, mind you.)
fennel
Forum God/Goddess
 
Posts: 3173
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:24 pm
Location: Inside the Green Zone, Madison

PreviousNext

Return to Cooking & Food issues

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

moviesmusiceats
Select a Movie
Select a Theater


commentsViewedForum
  ISTHMUS FLICKR

Promotions Contact us Privacy Policy Jobs Newsletters RSS
Collapse Photo Bar