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The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Music news, rumors, what you're listening to, how you're listening to it and whether it's all on the up-and-up.

Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby 7 » Fri Apr 05, 2013 4:35 pm

minicat wrote:Track 19 is genius:
http://cribshitter.bandcamp.com/album/methlehem


That is genius.
If you distilled every Dire Straits song down you might end up with that 50% blend of whispering vocals and soulful thumbing.
I think my fondness for them begins and ends with 1978's Dire Straights. There is NOT a bad song on that album.
A song here and there on albums past that.
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Igor » Sat Apr 06, 2013 11:27 am

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Dire Straits -- I don't listen to these guys much anymore, but I sure used to love'em. Making Movies remains my fave, Worst of all, of course, is when he's gay-baiting, like on the atrocious "Les Boys". Ick.


I never knew what his point was with that song, but it doesn't really matter whether it was supportive, baiting, or whatever. It is a lousy song. As Charles Barkley would say, "Turrible".

The rest of Making Movies is great. The first two albums are okay. Following "Making Movies" the only song I have heard which I liked was "Speedway at Nazareth".
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Wed Apr 10, 2013 12:24 pm

Igor wrote:
Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Worst of all, of course, is when he's gay-baiting, like on the atrocious "Les Boys". Ick.

I never knew what his point was with that song, but it doesn't really matter whether it was supportive, baiting, or whatever. It is a lousy song. As Charles Barkley would say, "Turrible".
Point conceded. No lyrical rewrite could save that song.

The real reason I'm posting again, however, is to heap praise first on minicat for hooking me up with Dion's post-Belmonts pre-Dion era stuff which I was missing, and secondly on Dion himself because holy shit this stuff is freaking awesome! I can't stop listening to it. His blues treatments are the weakest stuff here, and they're still pretty great. Even when the arrangements are less-than-inspired, his vocals still shine. And oh how they shine. I didn't really need any more evidence that Dion is one of rock'n'roll's greatest-ever singers but I sure have it in spades now. The folk-rock stuff in particular is amazing. I can't find any of the real standouts on YouTube (apart from the one mini already posted), but any chance you get to check this shit out should be jumped on.

Thank you, minicat!!
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Tue Apr 30, 2013 3:13 pm

The Dixie Cups -- Have I ever mentioned how much I love '60s girl group music? These ladies didn't record very much, but they have many more good sides then just their (justifiably) famous hits "Iko, Iko" and "Chapel Of Love". A couple more faves:
"People Say"
"I'm Gonna Get You Yet"

The Dixiebelles --Not terrible, but definitely one of the weakest discs in my girl group collection. Hey, it can't all be amazing.

Willie Dixon -- His 1970 LP I Am The Blues, released to cash in on his newfound fame after Zeppelin barrelled through some of his classics, is decidedly second-rate. A heckuva songwriter ("I Can't Quit You Baby", "Spoonful", "You Shook Me", "I Ain't Superstitious", "Hootchie Coochie Man", "Wang Dang Doodle", "I Just Want To Make Love To You", and on and on and on) but not the most exciting singer. I have a few sides from the late '40s through the mid-'50s, which are much better, but he really doesn't cook the way so many of his Chess contemporaries did (usually playing his songs.)

DMZ -- Jeff "Mono Man" Connoly's pre-Lyres band is driving Boston garage rock awesomeness. Their sole official LP, 1978's DMZ on Sire (produced by Flo and Eddie, of all people) isn't the best place to start, but is much better than its reputation, and occassionally reaches the heights of their earlier stuff, as compiled on When I Get Off and Radio Demos, which features a slew of great covers ("Til The End Of The Day", "Teenage Head", "Search And Destroy", "Heart Of Stone", "Glad All Over", "Somebody's Gonna Get Their Head Kicked In Tonight"). I prefer The Lyres generally, but DMZ rocked a lot harder.

Dr. Buzzard's Original "Savannah" Band -- why the fuck do I own this?

Dr. John -- I have an awful lot of Dr. John for some reason, even though a) much of it is pretty samey, and b) much of it is pretty middling. He has a knack for coming up with a great riff or a solid groove and then miring it in an otherwise dull song. That said, 1968's Gris-Gris remains a masterpiece, and anyone who has never heard should really check it out. Unlike any other record ever made. "Gris-Gris Gumbo Ya Ya" and "I Walk On Gilded Splinters" bookend the album, but even they don't fully prepare you for all its pleasures.
The other disc of "his" which gives me a lot of pleasure is Medical School which anthologizes a lot of his pre-fame work as a writer, producer, and session man. Good-to-great New Orleans R&B.

Dogbowl & Kramer -- Back when I listened to Bongwater all the time I started acquiring lots more stuff on the Shimmy-Disc label, most of it featuring Kramer, who was about as prolific as anyone back in the day. But like most who are that prolific, he seriously needed some kind of editing filter, which he most decidedly did not have being the owner/producer of his own label. And so there are countless albums like this one, Hot Day In Waco, where even though almost everything was written by Dogbowl, it all just sounds like Kramer... even a strange but unappealing cover of "Tracks Of My Tears". I'd sell it, but I'm sure nobody wants it.

Fats Domino -- fanfuckingtastic stuff. Fats makes everything sound snappy and peppy, even when singing about broken hearts and loneliness. Rollicking good times. Exhibit A for great rock'n'roll not needing guitar.
A few lesser-known faves (these don't sound too hot, and I couldn't find some of the ones I wanted, and Fats recordings are notoriously often at the wrong speed anyway, but the awesomeness of Fats still comes through):
"What's The Reason (I'm Not Pleasing You)"
"I Still Love You"
"Don't Lie To Me"

Next up... Don and Dewey!
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby scratch » Tue Apr 30, 2013 4:43 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Dr. Buzzard's Original "Savannah" Band -- why the fuck do I own this?


Perhaps you harbor a fascination with the early work of August Darnell?
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Kyle Motor » Wed May 01, 2013 9:44 am

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Next up... Don and Dewey!

Oh hell yes.
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Wed May 01, 2013 12:56 pm

Kyle Motor wrote:
Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Next up... Don and Dewey!

Oh hell yes.

Fantastic stuff. This has become a very oft-played CD at the Wagstaff Ranch over the last couple years.

Fun fact: Don Harris later swapped his guitar for a violin and, billed as "Sugarcane" Harris, ended up rocking out with Frank Zappa (he also supplied some organ on Chunga's Revenge) and Johnny Otis.

Don and Dewey:
"Justine"
"Jungle Hop"
"Kill Me"
"Jelly Bean"

"Sugarcane" Harris:
"Directly From My Heart To You"
"The Gumbo Variations"
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby rrnate » Wed May 01, 2013 1:55 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:The Dixie Cups -- Have I ever mentioned how much I love '60s girl group music? These ladies didn't record very much, but they have many more good sides then just their (justifiably) famous hits "Iko, Iko" and "Chapel Of Love". A couple more faves:
"People Say"
"I'm Gonna Get You Yet"


So yeah, I've always loved everything I've ever heard from the Dixie Cups but that's pretty much about 5 songs. Do you have any wisdom in terms of specific comps (or albums, but I doubt that's as much of an option here) that are worth checking out?
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Wed May 01, 2013 2:10 pm

rrnate wrote:So yeah, I've always loved everything I've ever heard from the Dixie Cups but that's pretty much about 5 songs. Do you have any wisdom in terms of specific comps (or albums, but I doubt that's as much of an option here) that are worth checking out?


This is the most complete collection I know of (and the one I have), though as you can see, it's an out-of-print import on a rinky-dink label.

I suspect this has better sound quality, but it also has 8 fewer songs and I'm no audiophile, so I've never bothered to find out for sure.
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Mon May 20, 2013 4:13 pm

Ral Donner -- Gained his fame (what little he ever had) for sounding enough like Elvis to fool some undiscerning record buyers (his first hit was a cover of "The Girl Of My Best Friend", an Elvis album cut), and while he doesn't deserve to be mentioned in the same breath as many others who followed in Elvis's wake, he also doesn't deserve to be as largely forgotten today as he seems to be. Like so many early '60s pop-rock stars, he largely rises and falls on the strength of his material -- some of which was less-than-stellar, to be sure -- but there's some great gems scattered throughout his singles. The Complete Ral Donner rounds up his recordings for George Goldner's Gone label, but unfortunately does not include my fave, "It Will Only Make Me Love You More", which came out on Red Bird.
A couple more:
"You Don't Know What You've Got (Until You Lose It)"
"To Love"

The Doobie Brothers -- I like a number of the pre-Michael McDonald singles just fine, but the 3 albums I have (1972's Toulouse Street, 1973's The Captain And Me, and 1975's Stampede) are all pretty samey and uninspired. I'd give Captain the nod because it contains both "China Grove" and "Long Train Runnin'", my two favorite singles, but I can't imagine why I'd ever want to jam these again any time soon. Heck, I'm not sure what possessed me to acquire them in the first place. Probably the low, low price.

Lee Dorsey -- I have a comp. plus some stray singles and that's it. Someone I would definitely like to explore further as I really enjoy his pop-soul style. Probably best known today for "Working In A Coal Mine" (a song I've never particularly cared for), there would seem to be a lot of little-heard pleasures in his catalog.
"Everything I Do Gohn Be Funky (From Now On)"
"Ride Your Pony"
"Get Out Of My Life Woman" (hey, minicat -- is this the original version of this?)

The Dovells -- often great dance-oriented white vocal group. Best-known for "The Bristol Stomp", which ain't any great shakes, but they really rock on stuff like "Betty In Bermudas" and "The Jitterbug". The rest of my faves are unavailable on YouTube. Admittedly, the 2CD set I have is more than anyone needs, but I could easily fill a single disc with mostly great stuff.

The Dramatics -- smooth-but-funky Detroit soul on Stax from the early '70s. All three of the albums I have -- 1972's Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get, 1973's A Dramatic Experience, and 1974's Dramatically Yours -- are pretty good (particually the first two), but like most such acts, they really shone on their singles. "Whatcha See Is Whatcha Get" is a stone-cold classic, as are "Get Up And Get Down" and "The Devil Is Dope". Unfortunately, I can't find a link for "Hum A Song (From Your Heart)", which really cooks.

The Drifters -- I could fill an entire page with links to great Drifters songs. I'd wager that either you already know of their pleasures or you're just not interested. I've got four CDs packed to the brim with great stuff. The Clyde McPhatter and Ben E. King stuff is almost all amazing and they continued making notable records for Atlantic even after King's departure. It's almost impossible to do justice to their history -- there've been dozens of Drifers over the years and lots of competing groups using the name -- but if you stick with the Atlantic recordings from 1953 through the mid-sixties, you really can't go wrong.

The Du-Droppers -- a great blend of gospel group harmony with the seeds of doo-wop and rock'n'roll from the early-to-mid-'50s.
"I Wanna Know" is a fave (and they even recorded their own "answer record" too: "I Found Out")
"Get Lost"
"Speed King" features some great Mickey Baker guitar.
I could listen to stuff in this style exclusively and never tire of it. Boot'em Up is the CD I have, and it's part of the British Acrobat label's series of pre-rock/doo-wop releases, which I highly recommend if you come across them.

Ducks Deluxe -- after Brinsley Schwarz, the best-known of the British pub rock groups from the '70s. The Brinsleys managed to put out lots of great records (as well as some stiffs) but Ducks Deluxe seem to have petered out after a pair of LPs from '73 and '74 (on record, anyway -- they splintered off into a variety of other bands but today they exist again and play live regularly.) Unfortunately, neither album is particularly consistent. At their best, they're pretty awesome, but there's a lot of filler here, lots of lackluster vocals, and just not enough to keep most people interested, I'd wager. But at their best, they really rocked.
"Coast To Coast"
"Don't Mind Rockin' Tonight"
Both of these songs sound like stuff I imagine Dr. Johnny Fever would've loved.

Doris Duke -- Swamp Dogg, one of my heroes, masterminded a couple albums by this Southern soul singer which I had heard about for years before finally coming across a 2-on-1 CD on the great UK Kent label. Unfortunately, they kinda leave me cold. Not sure what doesn't work for me, but there's just not much here I can recommend. Not bad, but just kinda uninspiring. Pity.

The Dukes Of Stratosphear -- XTC's hippie-dippy alter-egos. Chips From The Chocolate Fireball compiles both of their releases, 1985's 25 O'Clock mini-album and the full-length 1987 follow-up Psonic Psunspot. The mini probably gets the nod from me, but both are pretty fantastic, artfully blending XTC's poppier leanings with some (decidedly '80s-sounding) psychedelic goofiness.
So many pleasures here...
"My Love Explodes
"25 O'Clock"
"Collideascope"
"Vanishing Girl"
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Igor » Mon May 20, 2013 5:03 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Ducks Deluxe -- after Brinsley Schwarz, the best-known of the British pub rock groups from the '70s.


Just as a side note, I'm trying to think of a significant musical genre or trend that had less long term impact in the US than "pub rock". Or maybe it is just a case of the (good songs) / (music press articles) ratio being pretty low.
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Kyle Motor » Mon May 20, 2013 5:06 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:The Dovells -- often great dance-oriented white vocal group. Best-known for "The Bristol Stomp"....

I love this moronic song so much.

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Doris Duke -- Swamp Dogg, one of my heroes, masterminded a couple albums by this Southern soul singer which I had heard about for years before finally coming across a 2-on-1 CD on the great UK Kent label. Unfortunately, they kinda leave me cold. Not sure what doesn't work for me, but there's just not much here I can recommend. Not bad, but just kinda uninspiring. Pity.

The Duke/Dogg stuff is good, but it seems to get a lot of props while Swamp Dogg's collaboration with Irma Thomas gets ignored.....although that may change. In Between Tears is getting reissued. I can't recommend this album enough.
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Mon May 20, 2013 5:16 pm

Kyle Motor wrote:
Prof. Wagstaff wrote:The Dovells -- often great dance-oriented white vocal group. Best-known for "The Bristol Stomp"....

I love this moronic song so much.
I don't dislike it, but man, did you listen to the other two I posted?

Kyle Motor wrote:Swamp Dogg's collaboration with Irma Thomas gets ignored.....although that may change. In Between Tears has been reissued. I can't recommend this album enough.
I didn't even know this existed! The song you linked to is fantastic!

Igor wrote:Just as a side note, I'm trying to think of a significant musical genre or trend that had less long term impact in the US than "pub rock". Or maybe it is just a case of the (good songs) / (music press articles) ratio being pretty low.
Well, pub rock spawned Nick Lowe, who definitely influenced (and produced) some of the new wave/punky rock stuff pioneered by Stiff, and most of the guys who backed Graham Parker and Elvis Costello, both of whom definitely had some impact stateside. But yeah, I hear ya -- part of the problem is that it was essentially a live form which never seemed to translate particularly well to recordings, with the exception of the best Brinsley Schwarz stuff (who originated Lowe's "What's So Funny 'Bout Peace, Love, and Understanding" which remains one of Costello's better-known tracks.)
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Prof. Wagstaff » Wed May 29, 2013 11:35 am

Dyke And The Blazers -- fucking amazing JB-styled funky soul. This CD is a pure delight. I cannot recommend it more highly.

Ian Dury & The Blockheads -- I've got New Boots And Panties!!, Do It Yourself and a bunch of stray singles which fill most of a CD. So hard to pin this stuff down. It's pop-ska-new wave-disco-rock. Ian's "singing" is an acquired taste, I'd imagine, but I've loved him for so long it's hard to remember what I thought when I first heard him. Truly unique stuff, even from the Stiff stable.

Champion Jack Dupree -- the only album I have is Blues From The Gutter from 1959 on Atlantic, which is pretty good, but it doesn't contain my fave song of his, "Shake Baby Shake", which he recorded several times for several labels over the years. This version from 1967 is probably my favorite. Someone I would definitely like to explore more of, so any recommendations from other forons would be most welcome.

Dungen -- I have 4, which is a solid-enough prog album from 2008, but prog's not really my thing generally. I picked it up on the strength of "Samtidigt 1", which I probably heard on Pandora. But little else on the album stuck with me the way that did. I know nothing else by this group.

Which brings me to Bob Dylan...
It's been an interesting few days as I've plowed through his catalog.
Since he's so well-known and loved, going album by album in detail seems kinda pointless in this context, but I thought it might be interesting to assign some grades to them. Note that I'm grading these only in relation to each other (and also keep in mind that only those I have on CD are included):

Bob Dylan (1962) ****½
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963) ****
The Times They Are A-Changin' (1964) ***½
Another Side Of Bob Dylan (1964) ****½
Gaslight Tapes ***
Live 1964 ****
The Witmark Demos: 1962-1964 ***½
I really love solo acoustic Bob a lot. Every one of these has a few songs I could do without, and the archival releases which have come out in the last few decades contain all sorts of great stuff I wish he'd included instead, but all of these albums do a nice job of mixing up his many facets. This is also the era when Bob's voice really shone, in my opinion. Guy did a lot within his limitations.
The Gaslight Tapes suffers from bootleg-quality sound and the over-reliance on other people's songs, but dude was just starting out, after all. "No More Auction Block" is the highlight here, which showed up in better fidelity on the first Bootleg Series CD. The Live 1964 set is really fantastic. Bob's having a great time and the audience is eating it up. Disc One would rate 5 stars on its own, but I docked the set a star for Disc Two, 'cuz that's mostly Joan Baez duets. I am not a fan of Baez and her and Bob's voices do not blend well (Johnny and June they ain't.) Random note: "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right" has always been one of my favorite Dylan songs, based on the version from Freewheelin'. But he almost never sang it the way he does on the record, and all the other versions pale because he chooses to go up at the end of the each line, instead of deep down. It's his song and he can do whatever he wants with it, but I found it jarring every time I came across a different version. The Witmark Demos suffers, I think, from my high expectations. One of the greatest things on Biograph (and one of the greatest things he ever did, IMO) is the hauntingly gorgeous version of "Forever Young", which is just Bob singing into a publisher's tape recorder. I had hoped for more stuff as revelatory as that, but the Demos CD isn't nearly so interesting, unfortunately. More interesting historically than sonically.

Bringing It All Back Home (1965) *****
Highway 61 Revisited (1965) *****
Blonde On Blonde (1966) *****
Live 1966 ***½
What can I say about the trio of classics? Amazing shit still to this day. Surrounded by fantastic musicians all willing to follow him down some strange paths, with some of the greatest lyrical imagery ever conceived. Highway 61, in particular, is as close to perfection as a rock album gets. I'm pretty ambivalent about the live album. Hailed by many as a major triumph, I find his rushing-to-get-to-the-second-set performances on Disc One mostly less-than-stellar and when The Band shows up on Disc Two, it takes them a few songs to really get cooking. When you read about the show, everyone hails it as a triumph over adversity, where Bob and the Band angrily attack an unappreciative audience with their new rock sound. But listening to it doesn't quite bear this out. Yeah, somebody yells "Judas!" at him, but overall, the crowd seems quite enthused, and once the group finds their groove, rightfully so. The "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" alone is worth the price of admission. Side note: "Rainy Day Women" is the absolute worst opening track on an otherwise perfect record I can think of. So many other great songs from that era which never found their way onto Dylan LPs. Why he chose that one to kick off Blonde On Blonde will forever remain a mystery to me.

The Basement Tapes ****½
John Wesley Harding (1967) ***
Nashville Skyline (1969) **
New Morning (1970) ****
Pat Garret And Billy The Kid (1970) **
Greatest Hits Volume II *****
Obviously, not my favorite era for Dylan.
I know lots of folks think JWH is some kind of masterpiece, but I find it really boring. There's some great lyrics on there, to be sure, but not many good songs. Dylan doesn't get much credit for his exceptional melodies -- just compare these tracks to the stuff from his first 4 LPs and you'll see just how dull his songwriting had become. At least Skyline tries to keep things interesting, although it's mostly a failure. Dylan trying out different vocal approaches (something he'd always done, to be fair) doesn't help these records. That said, I find New Morning very listenable and full of pleasures. It's second-rate Dylan to be sure, but it's second-rate Dylan at the top of his game. And why I've never included "Winterlude" on any of my annual Christmas mixes is a mystery which will soon be rectified.
The Basement Tapes is fantastic, even in the cruddy-sounding non-remastered CD version I currently own. Dylan and The Band have never sounded better jamming together, and the songs run an emotional gamut matched only by his earliest work.
Greatest Hits Volume II is a very interestingly-chosen comp. and the otherwise-unavailable stuff is pretty stellar. "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere" is one of my favorite Bob tunes, and this is my favorite version. This is also by far my favorite version of "Mighty Quinn" (everyone sounds kinda drunk and having a rollicking good time, as opposed to the dirgey Biograph version). Plus "Watching The River Flow" and "When I Paint My Masterpiece"! "Tomorrow Is A Long Time"! "I Shall Be Released"! Fantastic.

Planet Waves (1974) *½
This gets its own "era" because it's just that awful and wrongheaded. There's some good songs on here (like the aforementioned "Forever Young", inexplicably included twice) that Dylan and The Band simply demolish. Pretty much unlistenable crap. I gave it one star just because I know there are worse Dylan albums, they're just not in my CD collection.
I wish I had Before The Flood on CD because that's really great. Hard to believe it's the same group of fellas on both.

Blood On The Tracks (1975) ***½
Desire (1975) **½
Blood has some of my fave Dylan songs -- "You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go", "Shelter From The Storm", "Tangled Up In Blue" -- but the band is pretty lackluster ("Simple Twist Of Fate" is a great song, nearly sunk by the inept bass playing). I also find Dylan's voice to be all over the map here.
I pretty much lose interest in Dylan after Desire. I used to like this record a lot more, but it mostly just leaves me cold these days. The whole Rolling Thunder-era I find pretty useless (I actually bought and quickly sold the live Bootleg Series CD from those shows because I found it insultingly awful.)

Biograph (1985) ***
The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 ****
No Direction Home ****
Hard to believe that Biograph was hailed as some kind of revelatory masterpiece at the time of its release, but it sure hasn't held up well given all the other archival releases since issued. There's a host of great stuff here, but the sequencing is pretty random and often just bad, and like so many box sets, it wants to pretend that the newer stuff is just as vital as the legendary stuff. Glad to have a lot of otherwise uncollected singles and some truly spectacular live and alternate stuff, but there's also plenty of dross here. The other two comps are much, much better, both in terms of quality of the selections and in historical interest. And I was pleasantly surprised that disc three of Bootleg was much better than I remembered it. Not great, but not the garbage dump I had assigned it in my memory.

Hey, Kyle -- what's your favorite Dylan record?
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Re: The Giant Wagstaff CD Listening Project Thread

Postby Kyle Motor » Wed May 29, 2013 1:09 pm

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:Hey, Kyle -- what's your favorite Dylan record?

Any one that I never have to hear or even look at. I wasn't going to comment, but.....

Prof. Wagstaff wrote:The whole Rolling Thunder-era I find pretty useless (I actually bought and quickly sold the live Bootleg Series CD from those shows because I found it insultingly awful.)


This is the stuff that turned my general disdain towards Dylan into all-out hatred. I worked at PrePlayed part-time years ago, and the employees would have a rotation of CDs in the carousel while working. Each person got one album. I would generally pick standard LP-length releases of catchy rock stuff. My hippie co-workers would play that horrific 2x70 minute CD set. Constantly. Sometimes two or three times a shift! The songs are terrible, the band sucks, Dylan's voice is unbelievably grating. His legend (which I didn't buy into to begin with) was completely and irreversibly shattered, and I'm glad. There are mountains of music that is so much better that I can spend all my time listening to.

The same situation turned me from meh-to-HATE on Talking Heads. Whatever unbearably-long live album of theirs I had to hear three times every shift was some of the most annoying music I've ever heard.
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