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Friday, October 24, 2014 |  Madison, WI: 49.0° F  Fog/Mist
The Paper

FEATURED STORY

The poker underground: Players see an opening to legalize the game in Wisconsin

Bellied up to a table in Players Sports Bar, the east-side tavern he's owned for a quarter-century, Mark Kroon adjusts his cap and points a thumb over his shoulder to a corner of the room. "We used to play right back here," he says. "This was about the mid-'80s. Phil probably wasn't even old enough to be in the bar at the time." >More

NEWS

Communities United is poised to play a critical role in addressing Madison's racial inequalities

Every month, a few dozen people gather at noon at the Urban League of Greater Madison's south-side headquarters. The June meeting of Communities United is the last before the group breaks for the summer, and Ananda Mirilli calls it to order right on time. Mirilli, restorative justice program manager for the YWCA, has been chairing these meetings for a year and attending for four. >More
 Lisa Subeck's win means female domination of Madison's seats in the Assembly

Lisa Subeck said her grassroots campaign and experience helped her win the race. "People do want a fighter," she said at her victory party at Schwoegler's bowling alley. >More
 Can Madison be a hotspot for bike tourism with Bikabout?

Megan Ramey loves to travel, but she prefers to explore on bicycle rather than with a big, clunky, gas-guzzling car. So whenever she takes trips, she researches a city's bicycle options, trails and bike-friendly businesses. >More
 Forward Fest 2014 grows to encompass food, music

Computer programmers and engineers, meet foodies and hopeful music-industry innovators. No longer limited to high-tech or biotech topics, this year's Forward Festival, taking place Aug. 21-28 in and around Madison, has evolved to make room for the growing cuisine and music startup movements. >More

OPINION & COMMENTARY

The voter ID mess in Wisconsin

How low can the Wisconsin Supreme Court go? It's a serious limbo competition. But the court's voter ID decision two weeks ago is right down there. >More
 Tell All: Should we shield our sex life from our son?

Dear Tell All: I'm a married guy with a 6-year-old son. It hasn't been easy for my wife and me to find time to have sex since he's been born. But we've recently instituted a once-a-week Saturday morning ritual that works out pretty well. >More

MUSIC

Sinking Suns explore revenge fantasies on a new EP of menacing rock songs

Sinking Suns drag darkness with them everywhere. The Madison trio, whose ominous name evokes the end of day, squeeze the light right out of their music. But on their new EP, Songs of Revenge, the path to catharsis is clearly marked. >More
 Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen top themselves with adventurous new record Cold Spell

"T'ain't no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones." So say the lyrics of a song by Tom Waits and William Burroughs. The opening licks of several bluegrass tunes by Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen bring these words to life. Solivan's honey-sweet tenor, Chris Luquette's guitar and Danny Booth's bass offer a soundtrack to the devil's summertime skinny-dipping adventures. >More

AT A GLANCE

ARTS

Two exhibitions at the James Watrous Gallery explore summer's pleasures with whimsical objects

I've spent the summer searching for an inexpensive grill, and by now I've grown mighty tired. Perhaps that's why I was drawn to the latest pair of shows at the James Watrous Gallery. >More
 American Players Theatre nails Chekhov's dark humor in The Seagull

The Seagull is not some boring old Russian play. Anton Chekhov's 1895 piece is stunningly relevant in 2014. The excellent production by American Players Theatre production (through Sept. 20) makes for a satisfying time at the Up-the-Hill Theatre in Spring Green; it's a show that will linger in audience members' minds for a long time. >More
 An unstable undercover agent creates multiple personalities in Legends

Martin Odum (Sean Bean) is a CIA agent who transforms himself into a different person for each undercover job. For example, he goes to great lengths to style himself as a creepy outsider to infiltrate a domestic terrorist group, masking his British accent with a stutter. Legends keeps you on the edge of your seat as Martin tries not to blow his cover under tremendous pressure. >More
 Madison's web celebs

The Internet has provided fertile ground for Madison's creative class for more than a decade. No longer limited by geography or traditional gatekeepers, local people are cultivating opportunities that simply didn't exist in the pre-digital world, especially opportunities to become celebrities of sorts. >More

MOVIES

A not-so-charming Magic in the Moonlight

Woody Allen. These are two of the most contentious words in contemporary movie-fan circles. From the scandals and accusations in his personal life to his homogenous character demographics, there is no neutral ground in conversations about the writer and director. >More
 A teen receives all of civilization's memories in The Giver

Teen dystopias are as hot as can be at the cineplex these days, as demonstrated by the massive popularity of the Twilight and Hunger Games franchises. The Giver certainly fits into the trend, but it's no latecomer to the party. The material on which it's based, Lois Lowry's Newbery Award-winning young-adult novel, has been celebrated and reviled since its release in 1993. >More
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ARCHIVE

EATS

Noodle nirvana at Hong Kong Station

Hong Kong Station is pinched into the unassuming 1400 block of Regent Street, the strip of small buildings across from Camp Randall that houses a tattoo parlor, a biryani joint, a key shop and now a noodle bowl sensation. >More

SPORTS & RECREATION

The Madison Area Sports Commission has spectacular success landing competitions

On Sept. 7, Madison will host Ironman Wisconsin for the 13th consecutive year. It's an event that long ago established itself by offering one of the most spectator-friendly courses on the entire Ironman triathlon circuit. More than 45,000 people spend hours standing along stretches of city streets and rural roads, cheering on runners and riders they'll never meet or even see again. >More
 The Big 5 NCAA conferences emerge triumphant

Depending on your point of view, last week collegiate athletics was either irretrievably lost or finally reformed for justice. >More
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